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Drew Boyd

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My Latest Blogs
Innovation in Practice tag:typepad.com,2003:weblog-1425731 2017-07-03T03:00:00-04:00 The Corporate Perspective on Innovation Methods TypePad typepad/dboyd/innovationinpracticehttps://feedburner.google.com Innovation Sighting: Attribute Dependency and The Total Eclipse of the Sun tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00e54ef4f376883401bb09aaa4e1970d 2017-07-03T03:00:00-04:00 2017-07-03T03:00:00-04:00 The United States Postal Service has just released a “first-of-its-kind” stamp that changes appearance when you touch it. What has inspired this small nugget of innovation? The August 21 total eclipse of the sun. It will be the first total... Drew Boyd <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p><a class="asset-img-link" href="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401b7c9077545970b-popup" onclick="window.open( this.href, '_blank', 'width=640,height=480,scrollbars=no,resizable=no,toolbar=no,directories=no,location=no,menubar=no,status=no,left=0,top=0' ); return false" style="display: inline;"><img alt="Total eclipse stamp image" class="asset asset-image at-xid-6a00e54ef4f376883401b7c9077545970b img-responsive" src="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401b7c9077545970b-320wi" style="float: right;" title="Total eclipse stamp image"></img></a>The United States Postal Service has just released a “first-of-its-kind” stamp that changes appearance when you touch it. What has inspired this small nugget of innovation? The August 21 total eclipse of the sun. It will be the first total eclipse to be seen in the U.S. mainland since 1979. Even more, a total eclipse has not traveled the entire span of the United States since 1918. Since millions of people hope to witness this historic event, the <br>USPS decided to commemorate it with a Forever Stamp.</p> <p>It just so happens that this newly issued stamp is a great example of the Attribute Dependency technique - one of the five innovation methods that make up <a href="http://www.sitsite.com/">Systematic Inventive Thinking</a> (SIT). Attribute Dependency works by creating (or breaking) a dependency between two attributes of a product or its environment. The Total Eclipse of the Sun Forever Stamp works in this way as the picture on the stamp changes when one rubs their thumb over it.</p> <p>According to the <a href="https://about.usps.com/news/national-releases/2017/pr17_020.htm">United States Postal Service</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>The stamp image is a photograph taken by astrophysicist Fred Espenak, aka <a href="http://www.mreclipse.com/MrEclipse.html"><em>Mr. Eclipse</em></a><em>,</em> of Portal, AZ, that shows a total solar eclipse seen from Jalu, Libya, on March 29, 2006.</p> <p>In the first U.S. stamp application of thermochromic ink, the Total Eclipse of the Sun Forever stamps will reveal a second image. Using the body heat of your thumb or fingers and rubbing the eclipse image will reveal an underlying image of the Moon (Espenak also took the photograph of the Full Moon). The image reverts back to the eclipse once it cools. </p> </blockquote> <p>The stamp is a great example of how SIT methods can be applied to any product, great or small. And, anyone can learn to create by utilizing these innovative methods, including you! If you would like to get the most out of the Attribute Dependency Technique, follow these steps:</p> <ol> <li>List internal/external variables.</li> <li>Pair variables (using a 2 x 2 matrix)</li> </ol> <ul> <li>Internal/internal</li> <li>Internal/external</li> </ul> <ol start="3"> <li>Create (or break) a dependency between the variables.</li> <li>Visualize the resulting virtual product.</li> <li>Identify potential user needs.</li> <li>Modify the product to improve it.</li> </ol> <p> </p> <p> </p></div><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=vBhcK_PkflA:r2qiT31bzGg:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=vBhcK_PkflA:r2qiT31bzGg:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=vBhcK_PkflA:r2qiT31bzGg:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=vBhcK_PkflA:r2qiT31bzGg:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=vBhcK_PkflA:r2qiT31bzGg:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=vBhcK_PkflA:r2qiT31bzGg:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice/~4/vBhcK_PkflA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/2017/07/innovation-sighting-attribute-dependency-and-the-total-eclipse-of-the-sun.html Innovation Sighting: Attribute Dependency and High Heels tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00e54ef4f376883401b8d28d46dd970c 2017-06-16T07:53:37-04:00 2017-06-16T07:53:37-04:00 A great example of the Attribute Dependency Technique can be found at My Place Café & Bar at the Hilton Osaka hotel in Japan. Attribute Dependency is one of the five innovation methods called Systematic Inventive Thinking (SIT). It works... Drew Boyd <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p><a class="asset-img-link" href="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401b8d28d4672970c-popup" onclick="window.open( this.href, '_blank', 'width=640,height=480,scrollbars=no,resizable=no,toolbar=no,directories=no,location=no,menubar=no,status=no,left=0,top=0' ); return false" style="float: right;"><img alt="High Heel Blog Image" class="asset asset-image at-xid-6a00e54ef4f376883401b8d28d4672970c img-responsive" src="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401b8d28d4672970c-320wi" style="margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px; border: 2px solid #292727;" title="High Heel Blog Image"></img></a>A great example of the <a href="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/attribute-dependency/">Attribute Dependency Technique</a> can be found at <a href="http://www.hiltonosaka.com/restaurants/myplace">My Place Café &amp; Bar</a> at the Hilton Osaka hotel in Japan. Attribute Dependency is one of the five innovation methods called <a href="http://www.sitsite.com/">Systematic Inventive Thinking</a> (SIT). It works by creating (or breaking) a dependency between two attributes of a product or its environment. And this technique is helping My Place increase their customer base in a surprising way by offering female customers a discount on their food and drink orders based on the height of their high heels. The higher the heel the greater the discount.</p> <p>According to <a href="http://www.foxnews.com/food-drink/2017/06/12/japanese-bar-offering-discounts-based-on-high-heel-height.html">Fox News</a>:</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">To qualify for the promotion, heels must be at least five centimeters (two inches) tall. But the higher the heel, the greater the discount on the bar’s select dining options, craft beer, organic wine and cocktails.</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">Discounts start at 10 percent off your order, with each additional two centimeters of heel height receiving a better deal.</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">Heels from seven to nine centimeters get 15 percent off, nine to 11 centimeters 20 percent, 11 to 13 centimeters 25 percent and 13 to 15 centimeters 30 percent. Anyone wearing heels above 15 centimeters (almost 6 inches!) will 40 percent off their bill.</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">My Place is running its “High Heels Ladies Night Discount” on Thursday nights starting June 15 and it lasts from 6 p.m. and 11:30 p.m.</p> <p>It’s true that anyone can learn to create by utilizing the SIT methods. If you would like to get the most out of the Attribute Dependency Technique, follow these steps:</p> <ol> <li>List internal/external variables.</li> <li>Pair variables (using a 2 x 2 matrix)</li> </ol> <ul> <li>Internal/internal</li> <li>Internal/external</li> </ul> <ol start="3"> <li>Create (or break) a dependency between the variables.</li> <li>Visualize the resulting virtual product.</li> <li>Identify potential user needs.</li> <li>Modify the product to improve it.</li> </ol></div><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=V4DnUikQw3A:GqUEzvXpJ3Q:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=V4DnUikQw3A:GqUEzvXpJ3Q:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=V4DnUikQw3A:GqUEzvXpJ3Q:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=V4DnUikQw3A:GqUEzvXpJ3Q:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=V4DnUikQw3A:GqUEzvXpJ3Q:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=V4DnUikQw3A:GqUEzvXpJ3Q:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice/~4/V4DnUikQw3A" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/2017/06/innovation-sighting-attribute-dependency-and-high-heels.html Innovation Sighting: LG's New Smart Vacuum Doubles as a Home Security System tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00e54ef4f376883401b8d2899162970c 2017-06-05T11:07:23-04:00 2017-06-05T11:07:23-04:00 Now here's a completely different take on home technology, and it's a perfect example of the Task Unification Technique, one of five in the S.I.T. innovation method. Task Unification is defined as: assigning an additional task to an existing resource. That resource should be in the immediate vicinity of the problem, or what we call The Closed World. In essence, it's taking something that is already around you and giving an additional job. The new LG Hom-Bot robotic vacuum does just that. Drew Boyd <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p><a class="asset-img-link" href="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401b8d2899c84970c-popup" onclick="window.open( this.href, '_blank', 'width=640,height=480,scrollbars=no,resizable=no,toolbar=no,directories=no,location=no,menubar=no,status=no,left=0,top=0' ); return false" style="float: right;"><img alt="LG Vacuum" class="asset asset-image at-xid-6a00e54ef4f376883401b8d2899c84970c img-responsive" height="190" src="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401b8d2899c84970c-320wi" style="margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;" title="LG Vacuum" width="253"></img></a>The rush to put new technology in the home is heating up like never before. <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/amazon-echo-google-home-microsoft-cortana-apple-siri-2017-1" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">Challengers</a> include Amazon (Echo), Google (Home), and soon we'll have Apple's Siri device. Microsoft can't be far behind.</p> <p>Now here's a completely different take on home technology, and it's a perfect example of the <a href="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/task-unification/">Task Unification Technique</a>, one of five in the S.I.T. innovation method. Task Unification is defined as: assigning an additional task to an existing resource. That resource should be in the immediate vicinity of the problem, or what we call The Closed World. In essence, it's taking something that is already around you and giving an additional job. The new <strong>LG Hom-Bot</strong> robotic vacuum does just that. Here's a report from <a href="http://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/lgs-hom-bot-smart-vacuum-doubles-as-a-home-security-system" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">Architectural Digest</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><em>Looking to buy a security system for your home? Consider a vacuum.</em></p> <p><em>LG's newest Hom-Bot robotic vacuum, available this month, merges cleaning and home security into one smartphone-controlled system.</em></p> <p><em>In addition to sweeping up dust and crumbs, the Hom-Bot has front and top-facing cameras that can be accessed through its app at any time. In a true representation of the "smart" vacuum, once it's become accustomed to your home, the Hom-Bot will also automatically snap photos and message them to you if it detects movement in an area of the home or at a time of the day when activity is unusual.</em></p> <p><em>A square-ish rather than rounded shape allows it to edge into tighter corners, and its cameras not only act as a safety measure but also help it more accurately map the room to achieve an efficient cleaning route. Its final feature is a sure appeal to a millennial audience: The vacuum is a rose-hued shade of "metallic gold."</em></p> <p><em>LG's Hom-Bot Turbo+ costs $999 but additional models without cameras retail for $799 and $699.</em></p> </blockquote> <p> To get the most out of the Task Unification technique, you follow five basic steps:</p> <ol> <li>List all of the components, both internal and external, that are part of the Closed World of the product, service, or process.</li> <li>Select a component from the list. Assign it an additional task, using one of three methods:</li> </ol> <ul> <li>Choose an external component and use it to perform a task that the product accomplishes already</li> <li>Choose an internal component and make it do something new or extra</li> <li>Choose an internal component and make it perform the function of an external component, effectively “stealing” the external component’s function</li> </ul> <ol start="3"> <li>Visualize the new (or changed) products or services.</li> <li>What are the potential benefits, markets, and values? Who would want this, and why would they find it valuable? If you are trying to solve a specific problem, how can it help address that particular challenge?</li> <li>If you decide the new product or service is valuable, then ask: Is it feasible? Can you actually create these new products? Perform these new services? Why or why not? Is there any way to refine or adapt the idea to make it viable?</li> </ol></div><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=PnPIUOa79RY:SF3ahNhMaJA:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=PnPIUOa79RY:SF3ahNhMaJA:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=PnPIUOa79RY:SF3ahNhMaJA:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=PnPIUOa79RY:SF3ahNhMaJA:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=PnPIUOa79RY:SF3ahNhMaJA:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=PnPIUOa79RY:SF3ahNhMaJA:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice/~4/PnPIUOa79RY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/2017/06/innovation-sighting-lgs-new-smart-vacuum-doubles-as-a-home-security-system.html Solution-to-Problem Innovation tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00e54ef4f376883401bb09a0e5e9970d 2017-05-31T10:54:21-04:00 2017-05-31T10:54:21-04:00 The Principle of Function Follows Form - innovating from the Solution to the Problem. Drew Boyd <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p><a class="asset-img-link" href="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401b8d2880241970c-popup" onclick="window.open( this.href, '_blank', 'width=640,height=480,scrollbars=no,resizable=no,toolbar=no,directories=no,location=no,menubar=no,status=no,left=0,top=0' ); return false" style="float: right;"><img alt="FFF" class="asset asset-image at-xid-6a00e54ef4f376883401b8d2880241970c img-responsive" height="257" src="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401b8d2880241970c-320wi" style="margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;" title="FFF" width="215"></img></a>Innovation is the process of taking an idea and putting it into practice. Creativity, on the other hand, is what you do in your head to generate the idea, an idea that meets three criteria. An innovative idea must be new, useful, and surprising. <br><br>New means that no one else has done it before. Useful means that it delivers some new value for you or your customers. And surprising? It means that the market will be delighted with your latest innovation.<br><br>Most people think the way you create an idea is to start with a well formed problem and then brainstorm a solution to it. What if you turned that around 180 degrees - It sounds counterintuitive, but you really can innovate by starting with a solution and then work backwards to the problem. In the <a href="http://www.sitsite.com" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">Systematic Inventive Thinking</a> method, we call it the <strong>Function Follows Form</strong> principle. Here’s how it works.<br><br>First, you start with an existing situation. That situation can be a product. It can be a service, or perhaps a process. You take that item and you make a list of its components and attributes. Then, you apply one of the five thinking tools - They’re called Subtraction, Division, Multiplication, Task Unification, and Attribute Dependency. I know some of these sound mathematical, but they’re really not as you’ll see when you start applying them.<br><br>When you apply one of the five tools to the existing situation, you artificially change it. It morphs into something that, at first, might seem really weird or absurd. That’s perfectly normal. In fact, as you get more comfortable with this method, you’ll come to expect it. We consider this strange thing a Virtual Product. It doesn't really exist except in one place – right up here in your mind.<br><br>This step is really important. Take your time. You have to mentally define and visualize the virtual product. I like to close my eyes at this step and mentally see an image of the item once it’s be manipulated. As you practice the method more, this will get a lot easier.<br><br>At this next stage, you ask yourself two questions, and you do it in this specific order. First question is, should we do it? Does this new configuration create any advantage or solve some problem? Is there a target audience who would find this beneficial? Does it deliver an unmet need? We call this step the market filter. It’s a filter because if you cannot identify even the tiniest benefit at this step, you throw the concept out the window. You don’t waste anymore time on it. This is very different than other ideation techniques like Brainstorming where “there’s no bad idea.” Trust me! There are plenty of bad ideas, and if you realize one here, you eject it and you go back and re-apply the tool to generate a different concept. <br><br>If you do identify some benefit, then and only then do you ask yourself the second question: Can we do it? Do we have the technical know-how to make this concept? Is it feasible? Do we have the intellectual property? Are there regulatory or legal barriers? This step is the Implementation Filter, because, once again, if you have a great idea in theory but you have no way to make it, don't waste anymore time on it. <br><br>If you pass through both filters, you move to the Adaptations step where you allow yourself some degree of freedom to modify the concept to make it even stronger and deliver even more value. You may have to iterate through these steps several times before you end up with what I would consider an idea.</p> <p>The Principle of <strong>Function Follows Form</strong> - innovating from the Solution to the Problem.</p></div><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=5frD_DwXZP0:y6b-IcQAylA:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=5frD_DwXZP0:y6b-IcQAylA:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=5frD_DwXZP0:y6b-IcQAylA:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=5frD_DwXZP0:y6b-IcQAylA:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=5frD_DwXZP0:y6b-IcQAylA:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=5frD_DwXZP0:y6b-IcQAylA:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice/~4/5frD_DwXZP0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/2017/05/solution-to-problem-innovation.html