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Drew Boyd

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My Latest Blogs
Innovation in Practice tag:typepad.com,2003:weblog-1425731 2017-08-21T03:00:00-04:00 The Corporate Perspective on Innovation Methods TypePad typepad/dboyd/innovationinpracticehttps://feedburner.google.com How a Case of Laryngitis Helped Me Find My Voice and Grow as a Leader tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00e54ef4f376883401bb09ba275c970d 2017-08-21T03:00:00-04:00 2017-08-21T03:00:00-04:00 By Deb Gabor As a brand strategist, author, and public speaker, I rely upon my voice and storytelling ability to make a living. I’ve observed that my interpersonal communication style is less 1:1 and more “broadcast” in nature. I get... Drew Boyd <p><strong>By Deb Gabor</strong><br>  <br> As a brand strategist, author, and public speaker, I rely upon my voice and storytelling ability to make a living. I’ve observed that my interpersonal communication style is less 1:1 and more “broadcast” in nature. I get in a room full of people, position myself directly in the center, and hold court. At a leadership conference featuring 10-hour days of training and intense strategy sessions for 1500 member leaders and staffers of a global organization of chief executives of private companies, I lost my voice…and at the same time found it. Along the way, I learned how developing deep emotional connections with individuals and practicing the art of followership can contribute to my growth as a leader.<br>  <br> About two days into the conference, I conceded defeat to a case of laryngitis that rendered me mute. Unable to speak above a whisper, I carried around a handwritten sign detailing my name, my role, and my hometown. Without my voice, I could no longer rely upon my trademark extrovert friendliness and ability to get a conversation going among strangers. I couldn’t raise my hand to ask questions that make me look smart to the rest of the room. I couldn’t make insightful observations that position me as an expert in my field. Instead of the center of attention, I was an audience member, skirting the fringes of conversational groups. Instead of a speaker, I was a listener. Instead of a leader, I was a follower.<br>  <br> Throughout my career, managers have recognized me for my brusque and direct communication style and tough-but-fair management approach, which typify what the Chinese call the masculine “yang” side of my energy. However, abundance, emotional closeness, and nurturing come from our feminine “yin” side. While I value these qualities in my personal life, I never knew the potential they could have for me in business.<br>  <br> During my unintentional silent retreat, I came face to face – or rather mouth to ear – with fascinating people with whom I may have never had a conversation. I whispered in people’s ears, drawing them into my personal space so I could get my points across. Even though I could hear them fine, my new acquaintances reciprocated by leaning in and whispering in my ear, instantly forming intimate bonds. There’s something about feeling a stranger’s breath on your face that makes you dispense with traditional pleasantries and small talk. Through these deep, one on one conversations, I learned about other CEOs’ joys, fears, and vulnerabilities. I listened closely to their observations about the frenzied conference activity going on around us. We talked about global politics, employees, taxes, our kids, relationships. We formed bonds that normally take business people years to nurture. I listened; I learned, and I was inspired.<br>  <br> For about four days I practiced a type of leadership I’ll call “followership.” The business world has validated my compulsion to speak up and assume responsibility for the strategies and tasks that I ignorantly thought everyone else was incapable of. As a result of my unrelenting desire to assert my authority over everything, I missed the fact that there are others who are capable and desirous of owning and doing things. Most of them are smarter and better than I.<br>  <br> In my life as an extrovert with a loud, confident voice and a healthy ego, I did most of the talking – closing off conversational threads and ideas coming from others. I learned that much of my leadership style is based upon being a hero and feeding my own ego. And that has been at the expense of some really worthwhile relationships and ideas.<br>  <br> I had two big ah-hahs from my voice loss:<br>  <br> <strong>1) My assumption that the state of leadership is a lonely existence is largely incorrect. </strong>It really doesn’t have to be. Any loneliness I have felt as a leader has been self-inflicted. The “holding court” style of communication has blocked me from developing vital and meaningful relationships with other humans (employees, colleagues, clients, mentors, friends) that have the power to inspire and nourish me in ways I never thought possible.<br>  <br> <strong>2) No one can (or should) lead all the time.</strong> Followership is the other side of leadership. Followership is the ability to take direction, to enthusiastically support a program, to be part of a team, and to deliver on promises. The concept of followership doesn’t get a lot of airtime because being a follower isn’t fun or sexy. They don’t really teach it in business school, and it certainly isn’t trumpeted as a key to sustainable business success. But followership delivers great rewards. Sitting back and letting others share their ideas, strategies, and responsibility for executing lets creativity flourish and empowers other people to grow as leaders themselves.<br>  <br> I have since returned to my day job and regained my speaking voice. I am consciously letting others hold court - although, this is really difficult for me. I am letting others speak up, and I am actively and attentively listening. I am peeling off individuals to connect with them more on a one-on-one basis so I can really understand what drives and scares them. Perhaps most importantly, I am letting others step up to be in charge, putting my voice and my ego in check, with great positive impact in my business.<br>  <br> <em>Deb Gabor is the author of Branding is Sex: Get Your Customers Laid and Sell the Hell Out of Anything. She is the founder of Sol Marketing which has led brand strategy engagements for organizations ranging from international household names like Dell, Microsoft, and NBC Universal, to digital winners like Allrecipes, Cheezburger, HomeAway and RetailMeNot, and dozens of early-stage tech and digital media titans. For more information, please visit <a href="http://www.solmarketing.com">www.solmarketing.com</a> and connect with Deb on Twitter, @deb_sol.</em></p><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=OUmNTT1iexo:to6C7q7zTs8:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=OUmNTT1iexo:to6C7q7zTs8:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=OUmNTT1iexo:to6C7q7zTs8:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=OUmNTT1iexo:to6C7q7zTs8:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=OUmNTT1iexo:to6C7q7zTs8:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=OUmNTT1iexo:to6C7q7zTs8:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice/~4/OUmNTT1iexo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/2017/08/how-a-case-of-laryngitis-helped-me-find-my-voice-and-grow-as-a-leader.html Should Innovators Reveal How Much They Let Technology Make Creative Choices? tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00e54ef4f376883401bb09b1f365970d 2017-07-24T12:07:15-04:00 2017-07-24T12:07:16-04:00 Is it true? Do the most creative people generate ideas straight out of their heads without any outside help? That's what most people would tell you. But the reality is that the best innovators boost their creative output with the help of structured tools like patterns and even technology. Drew Boyd <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p><a class="asset-img-link" href="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401bb09b1f3fb970d-popup" onclick="window.open( this.href, '_blank', 'width=640,height=480,scrollbars=no,resizable=no,toolbar=no,directories=no,location=no,menubar=no,status=no,left=0,top=0' ); return false" style="float: right;"><img alt="Brain" class="asset asset-image at-xid-6a00e54ef4f376883401bb09b1f3fb970d img-responsive" src="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401bb09b1f3fb970d-320wi" style="margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;" title="Brain"></img></a>Is it true? Do the most creative people generate ideas straight out of their heads without any outside help? That's what most people would tell you. But the reality is that the best innovators boost their creative output with the help of structured tools like patterns and even technology.</p> <p>David Pogue wrote a brilliant <a href="https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/should-artists-reveal-how-much-they-let-technology-make-creative-choices/" rel="noopener" target="_blank">article</a> in Scientific American titled, "Should Artists Reveal How Much They Let Technology Make Creative Choices?" He cites numerous examples of how artists and entertainers use various types of aides to create their masterpieces. From the article:</p> <blockquote> <p><em>Apple's GarageBand program for Mac computers lets you create fully orchestrated “compositions” just by dragging tiles into a grid. Everything sounds great, whether or not you know anything about rhythm, pitch or harmony. At the time of GarageBand's introduction, its product manager told me that even if the program semiautomates the composition process, it still gives people a taste of the real thing. It could inspire a novice to learn music, maybe take up an instrument.</em></p> <p><em>Agreed. But how can we gauge artists' talent without knowing how much of the work was theirs? Should it affect how much we pay for their output? And what about when commercial musicians use GarageBand to produce their tracks—as Oasis and many indie bands have done?</em></p> <p><em>Everyone knows that technology assists almost every creative endeavor these days, from the moment a four-year-old drips paint onto a turntable to make spin art. We also are aware that Hollywood uses computers for its special effects and that most pop songs are Auto-Tuned and pitch-corrected. But in those cases, the audience is in on the fact that machinery has helped out. </em></p> <p><em>It's not the same thing when technology's assistance is concealed from us and is credited to the human. That's why lip-synching at live concerts is still controversial and why athletes are disqualified for secretly using drugs or other performance enhancements. Disclosing when our creative works have come from canned parts isn't just important for intellectual honesty; it would also make a better barometer for the rising tide of robots entering creative fields. (If you hadn't heard, robots are now capable of composing chorales and painting portraits.)</em></p> <p><em>These days even professional musicians, artists and performers can substitute an on/off switch for human talent. Shouldn't the public know which is which?”</em></p> </blockquote> <p>David's point about whether the public should know is well-taken. But in the grand scheme things, what matters most is how humans can elevate their creative output. Extensive research has shown structured approaches do more to boost creative output than to limit it. For thousands of years, inventors have embedded five simple patterns into their inventions, usually without knowing it. These patterns are the "DNA" of products that can be extracted and applied to any product or service to create new-to-the-world innovations. Using these patterns is no different than using a human-engineered technology. The technology has within it the wisdom of its creator that is then transferred to others to boost their creativity.</p> <p>Humans have evolved to create. Stepping on the shoulders of others, be it through a technology or a pattern, is our next evolutionary path.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p></div><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=K7Tbq39dyAs:7lnNmVLMgEE:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=K7Tbq39dyAs:7lnNmVLMgEE:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=K7Tbq39dyAs:7lnNmVLMgEE:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=K7Tbq39dyAs:7lnNmVLMgEE:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=K7Tbq39dyAs:7lnNmVLMgEE:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=K7Tbq39dyAs:7lnNmVLMgEE:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice/~4/K7Tbq39dyAs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/2017/07/should-innovators-reveal-how-much-they-let-technology-make-creative-choices.html Innovation Sighting: Attribute Dependency and The Total Eclipse of the Sun tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00e54ef4f376883401bb09aaa4e1970d 2017-07-03T03:00:00-04:00 2017-07-03T03:00:00-04:00 The United States Postal Service has just released a “first-of-its-kind” stamp that changes appearance when you touch it. What has inspired this small nugget of innovation? The August 21 total eclipse of the sun. It will be the first total... Drew Boyd <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p><a class="asset-img-link" href="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401b7c9077545970b-popup" onclick="window.open( this.href, '_blank', 'width=640,height=480,scrollbars=no,resizable=no,toolbar=no,directories=no,location=no,menubar=no,status=no,left=0,top=0' ); return false" style="display: inline;"><img alt="Total eclipse stamp image" class="asset asset-image at-xid-6a00e54ef4f376883401b7c9077545970b img-responsive" src="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401b7c9077545970b-320wi" style="float: right;" title="Total eclipse stamp image"></img></a>The United States Postal Service has just released a “first-of-its-kind” stamp that changes appearance when you touch it. What has inspired this small nugget of innovation? The August 21 total eclipse of the sun. It will be the first total eclipse to be seen in the U.S. mainland since 1979. Even more, a total eclipse has not traveled the entire span of the United States since 1918. Since millions of people hope to witness this historic event, the <br>USPS decided to commemorate it with a Forever Stamp.</p> <p>It just so happens that this newly issued stamp is a great example of the Attribute Dependency technique - one of the five innovation methods that make up <a href="http://www.sitsite.com/">Systematic Inventive Thinking</a> (SIT). Attribute Dependency works by creating (or breaking) a dependency between two attributes of a product or its environment. The Total Eclipse of the Sun Forever Stamp works in this way as the picture on the stamp changes when one rubs their thumb over it.</p> <p>According to the <a href="https://about.usps.com/news/national-releases/2017/pr17_020.htm">United States Postal Service</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>The stamp image is a photograph taken by astrophysicist Fred Espenak, aka <a href="http://www.mreclipse.com/MrEclipse.html"><em>Mr. Eclipse</em></a><em>,</em> of Portal, AZ, that shows a total solar eclipse seen from Jalu, Libya, on March 29, 2006.</p> <p>In the first U.S. stamp application of thermochromic ink, the Total Eclipse of the Sun Forever stamps will reveal a second image. Using the body heat of your thumb or fingers and rubbing the eclipse image will reveal an underlying image of the Moon (Espenak also took the photograph of the Full Moon). The image reverts back to the eclipse once it cools. </p> </blockquote> <p>The stamp is a great example of how SIT methods can be applied to any product, great or small. And, anyone can learn to create by utilizing these innovative methods, including you! If you would like to get the most out of the Attribute Dependency Technique, follow these steps:</p> <ol> <li>List internal/external variables.</li> <li>Pair variables (using a 2 x 2 matrix)</li> </ol> <ul> <li>Internal/internal</li> <li>Internal/external</li> </ul> <ol start="3"> <li>Create (or break) a dependency between the variables.</li> <li>Visualize the resulting virtual product.</li> <li>Identify potential user needs.</li> <li>Modify the product to improve it.</li> </ol> <p> </p> <p> </p></div><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=vBhcK_PkflA:r2qiT31bzGg:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=vBhcK_PkflA:r2qiT31bzGg:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=vBhcK_PkflA:r2qiT31bzGg:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=vBhcK_PkflA:r2qiT31bzGg:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=vBhcK_PkflA:r2qiT31bzGg:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=vBhcK_PkflA:r2qiT31bzGg:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice/~4/vBhcK_PkflA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/2017/07/innovation-sighting-attribute-dependency-and-the-total-eclipse-of-the-sun.html Innovation Sighting: Attribute Dependency and High Heels tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00e54ef4f376883401b8d28d46dd970c 2017-06-16T07:53:37-04:00 2017-06-16T07:53:37-04:00 A great example of the Attribute Dependency Technique can be found at My Place Café & Bar at the Hilton Osaka hotel in Japan. Attribute Dependency is one of the five innovation methods called Systematic Inventive Thinking (SIT). It works... Drew Boyd <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p><a class="asset-img-link" href="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401b8d28d4672970c-popup" onclick="window.open( this.href, '_blank', 'width=640,height=480,scrollbars=no,resizable=no,toolbar=no,directories=no,location=no,menubar=no,status=no,left=0,top=0' ); return false" style="float: right;"><img alt="High Heel Blog Image" class="asset asset-image at-xid-6a00e54ef4f376883401b8d28d4672970c img-responsive" src="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401b8d28d4672970c-320wi" style="margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px; border: 2px solid #292727;" title="High Heel Blog Image"></img></a>A great example of the <a href="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/attribute-dependency/">Attribute Dependency Technique</a> can be found at <a href="http://www.hiltonosaka.com/restaurants/myplace">My Place Café &amp; Bar</a> at the Hilton Osaka hotel in Japan. Attribute Dependency is one of the five innovation methods called <a href="http://www.sitsite.com/">Systematic Inventive Thinking</a> (SIT). It works by creating (or breaking) a dependency between two attributes of a product or its environment. And this technique is helping My Place increase their customer base in a surprising way by offering female customers a discount on their food and drink orders based on the height of their high heels. The higher the heel the greater the discount.</p> <p>According to <a href="http://www.foxnews.com/food-drink/2017/06/12/japanese-bar-offering-discounts-based-on-high-heel-height.html">Fox News</a>:</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">To qualify for the promotion, heels must be at least five centimeters (two inches) tall. But the higher the heel, the greater the discount on the bar’s select dining options, craft beer, organic wine and cocktails.</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">Discounts start at 10 percent off your order, with each additional two centimeters of heel height receiving a better deal.</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">Heels from seven to nine centimeters get 15 percent off, nine to 11 centimeters 20 percent, 11 to 13 centimeters 25 percent and 13 to 15 centimeters 30 percent. Anyone wearing heels above 15 centimeters (almost 6 inches!) will 40 percent off their bill.</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">My Place is running its “High Heels Ladies Night Discount” on Thursday nights starting June 15 and it lasts from 6 p.m. and 11:30 p.m.</p> <p>It’s true that anyone can learn to create by utilizing the SIT methods. If you would like to get the most out of the Attribute Dependency Technique, follow these steps:</p> <ol> <li>List internal/external variables.</li> <li>Pair variables (using a 2 x 2 matrix)</li> </ol> <ul> <li>Internal/internal</li> <li>Internal/external</li> </ul> <ol start="3"> <li>Create (or break) a dependency between the variables.</li> <li>Visualize the resulting virtual product.</li> <li>Identify potential user needs.</li> <li>Modify the product to improve it.</li> </ol></div><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=V4DnUikQw3A:GqUEzvXpJ3Q:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=V4DnUikQw3A:GqUEzvXpJ3Q:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=V4DnUikQw3A:GqUEzvXpJ3Q:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=V4DnUikQw3A:GqUEzvXpJ3Q:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=V4DnUikQw3A:GqUEzvXpJ3Q:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=V4DnUikQw3A:GqUEzvXpJ3Q:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice/~4/V4DnUikQw3A" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/2017/06/innovation-sighting-attribute-dependency-and-high-heels.html