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Drew Boyd

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Innovation in Practice tag:typepad.com,2003:weblog-1425731 2017-10-05T09:10:44-04:00 The Corporate Perspective on Innovation Methods TypePad typepad/dboyd/innovationinpracticehttps://feedburner.google.com Look Inside a Woman's Purse tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00e54ef4f376883401b7c927181e970b 2017-10-05T09:10:44-04:00 2017-10-05T09:10:44-04:00 By: Tom Ewing, Senior Director, System1 Group “First I look at the purse” sang Motown’s The Countours. Kelley Styring, principal of InsightFarm, would sympathise. In 2006, then again in 2016, she asked hundreds of women to empty out their purses... Drew Boyd <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p><em>By: Tom Ewing, Senior Director, System1 Group</em></p> <p><a class="asset-img-link" href="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401bb09ca3705970d-popup" onclick="window.open( this.href, '_blank', 'width=640,height=480,scrollbars=no,resizable=no,toolbar=no,directories=no,location=no,menubar=no,status=no,left=0,top=0' ); return false" style="float: right;"><img alt="Purse" class="asset asset-image at-xid-6a00e54ef4f376883401bb09ca3705970d img-responsive" src="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401bb09ca3705970d-300wi" style="width: 275px; margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px; border: 3px #000000;" title="Purse"></img></a>“First I look at the purse” sang Motown’s The Countours. Kelley Styring, principal of InsightFarm, would sympathise. In 2006, then again in 2016, she asked hundreds of women to empty out their purses in the name of science. Her project, “an archaeology of the American handbag”, explores the meaning both personal and practical of purses – and, er, ‘murses’, since men are carrying them too: one of the big shifts between waves of the study. (The men themselves might prefer the term ‘satchels’.)</p> <p>Between them, the purse-carrying women and men of America are toting an astonishing 271 million bags: “homes away from home” which are a remarkable commercial opportunity for any company making things that might find their way into them. But this opportunity is poorly understood, and manufacturers of both purses and purse contents are failing their customers, according to Styring. The interior of a purse is an extremely hostile environment, halfway between a tumble-dryer and a lucky dip, and the lipsticks, coupons, receipts, and headphone cords which find their way in are prone to gradually degrade into either trash or “digital hairballs”. The purse is both beautifully practical – a little bag you can carry your life’s essentials in – and desperately unwieldy during the precious seconds when you’re trying to get something out of it.</p> <p>Styring’s entertaining presentation married survey research and ethnography to explore not just what’s in America’s purses (1 in 10 contains a weapon, though the main categories are money, cards, phones, personal care, and keys) but what they mean. She explored the <em>Circle of Preparedness</em> – the way the contents of a purse enable its carrier to be ready to help herself, her family, her friends and often complete strangers who need a band-aid, a pen, or a light. The purse is an entry point into adulthood for women in their early teens for whom it becomes a mobile resource for their newfound independence, carrying money, phones and sanitary items. Gain entry to a purse in these formative years and categories and brands can make a customer for life.</p> <p>But the purse is also a kind of limbo, into which items are placed and forgotten: one woman Styring surveyed turned out to be carrying 17 different pens, mostly promotional ones liberated from stores and banks. Unwanted receipts, degraded tissues, and forgotten gewgaws fight for space with genuine essentials. And into this behavioural melting pot, an unexpected interloper has found its way between 2006 and now: the smartphone.</p> <p>Behaviours around smartphones both complement and duplicate behaviours around purses. Both are connectors – bridges between home (where needs are made) and the store (where needs are satisfied). Both are also ways of organising and making portable one’s everyday life – the purse content categories which dropped off between ways are things like coupons, which are increasingly being replaced by e-commerce and m-commerce offers. Despite this, the weight and the number of items in purses remained constant over the last decade – for every obsolete category, some new item comes to take their place.</p> <p>Smartphones and purses may overlap in function, but purses are also where you put your phone. This integration between digital order and physical mess is where Strying sees some of the billions of dollars of innovation potential in the world of the purse. What will smart purses look like – ones that respond to being opened with useful information, or which establish a cone of RFID silence to protect their bearer? There are also plenty of purely physical problems still to solve – there must be a way of designing purse contents for the dangerous environments they are placed in.</p> <p>Styring’s presentation was a delight –rich in insights and stories: her firm InsightFarm has published a book detailing the results of the second wave. You came away feeling that her study was rather like a purse itself: elegantly designed, compact, and full of both useful stuff and unexpected surprises.</p> <p>Article reposted by permission of KNect365. View original article <a href="https://knect365.com/insights/article/d4f73199-9e30-4081-9b5e-9581ca5459fb/look-inside-a-womans-purse?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_campaign=IMI%2FContent%2FM2904%2FSept%20Insights%20Main%202017&amp;utm_source=IMI%20Insights%20%26%20Innovation%20Newsletters&amp;user_id=900047296967&amp;tracker_id=023GZ2TXA">here</a>.</p> <p><em><a href="https://informa.com/divisions/knowledge-and-networking/">KNect365</a>, the Knowledge &amp; Networking Division of Informa, organizes high-quality, content-driven events and programs that enable specialist communities to meet, connect, network and share knowledge. KNect365 provides digital content, memorable face to face experiences, networking and professional development and learning for customers in key industry verticals, including Finance, Life Sciences and Technology.</em></p></div><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=kkx5i75c7nA:A3vmGoejDVc:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=kkx5i75c7nA:A3vmGoejDVc:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=kkx5i75c7nA:A3vmGoejDVc:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=kkx5i75c7nA:A3vmGoejDVc:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=kkx5i75c7nA:A3vmGoejDVc:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=kkx5i75c7nA:A3vmGoejDVc:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice/~4/kkx5i75c7nA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/2017/10/look-inside-a-womans-purse.html Innovation Sighting: Task Unification and GladWare Containers tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00e54ef4f376883401b7c9212494970b 2017-09-18T07:36:08-04:00 2017-09-18T07:36:08-04:00 GladWare containers have become a common household item. Most kitchens today have that designated drawer filled to the brim with self-stacking plastic wonders and the infamous lids with the center circle. Those center circles are most convenient, providing an interlocking... Drew Boyd <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p><span style="font-size: 11pt;"><span style="font-size: 12pt;">GladWare containers have become a common household item. Most kitchens today have that designated drawer filled to the brim with self-stacking plastic wonders and the infamous lids with the center circle. Those center circles are most convenient, providing an interlocking feature for stacking, as GladWare intended.  </span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 11pt;"><span style="font-size: 12pt;"> <a class="asset-img-link" href="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401bb09c4569f970d-popup" onclick="window.open( this.href, '_blank', 'width=640,height=480,scrollbars=no,resizable=no,toolbar=no,directories=no,location=no,menubar=no,status=no,left=0,top=0' ); return false" style="float: right;"><img alt="Screen Shot 2017-09-18 at 6.49.39 AM" class="asset asset-image at-xid-6a00e54ef4f376883401bb09c4569f970d img-responsive" src="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401bb09c4569f970d-250wi" style="width: 250px; margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px; border: 3px #000000;" title="Screen Shot 2017-09-18 at 6.49.39 AM"></img></a></span></span><span style="font-size: 12pt;">Yet just a week ago, a photo of a typical, everyday moment went viral. A mom packing lunches for her family <br>snapped a shot of her partially filled GladWare containers, revealing a less-known innovation feature: a lid within a lid.  Who knew all along that Glad’s dressing cups fit up into the larger lid! Not only did the lightbulb come on for tens of thousands of lunch packers, but it revealed an innovation template within the GladWare design: Task Unification.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt;">Task Unification is defined as: assigning an additional task to an existing resource. That resource should be in the immediate vicinity of the problem, or what we call The Closed World. In essence it’s taking something that is already around you and giving an additional job. Glad, through the integration of a center circle in its lids, created an additional lid for its smaller dressing containers, resulting in an all-in-one packing option.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt;"><a href="http://www.foxnews.com/food-drink/2017/09/13/gladwares-container-lids-are-blowing-peoples-minds.html">Fox News</a> shares:</span></p> <blockquote> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt;">Though Glad has <a href="https://www.glad.com/food-storage/containers/glad-to-go-lunch/">marketed its To-Go Lunch</a> containers as equipped with special “dressing cups that snap into [the] lid,” most have just assumed the circle in the middle of the lid was a design feature, not a built-in dressing holder.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt;">But now that this lunch hack has been revealed, it’s likely that more and more people will be taking advantage of the spill-proof cap storage.</span></p> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt;">You can also utilize this technique to innovate helpful products. To get the most out of the Task Unification technique, you follow five basic steps:</span></p> <ol> <li><span style="font-size: 12pt;">List all of the components, both internal and external, that are part of the Closed World of the product, service, or process.</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 12pt;">Select a component from the list. Assign it an additional task, using one of three methods:</span></li> </ol> <ul> <li><span style="font-size: 12pt;">Choose an external component and use it to perform a task that the product accomplishes already</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 12pt;">Choose an internal component and make it do something new or extra</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 12pt;">Choose an internal component and make it perform the function of an external component, effectively “stealing” the external component’s function</span></li> </ul> <ol start="3"> <li><span style="font-size: 12pt;">Visualize the new (or changed) products or services.</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 12pt;">What are the potential benefits, markets, and values? Who would want this, and why would they find it valuable? If you are trying to solve a specific problem, how can it help address that particular challenge?</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 12pt;">If you decide the new product or service is valuable, then ask: Is it feasible? Can you actually create these new products? Perform these new services? Why or why not? Is there any way to refine or adapt the idea to make it viable?</span></li> </ol></div><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=CU81OB4S8mk:2RXMKvgXZU0:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=CU81OB4S8mk:2RXMKvgXZU0:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=CU81OB4S8mk:2RXMKvgXZU0:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=CU81OB4S8mk:2RXMKvgXZU0:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=CU81OB4S8mk:2RXMKvgXZU0:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=CU81OB4S8mk:2RXMKvgXZU0:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice/~4/CU81OB4S8mk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/2017/09/innovation-sighting-task-unification-and-gladware-containers.html How a Creative Legal Leap Helped Create Vast Wealth tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00e54ef4f376883401bb09c0372c970d 2017-09-05T08:10:34-04:00 2017-09-05T08:10:34-04:00 By Tim Harford, BBC World Service, 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy In 1911, someone asked Butler to name the most important invention of the industrial era. Steam, perhaps? Electricity? "No," he said. They would both "be reduced to... Drew Boyd <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p><span class="byline__name"><strong>By Tim Harford</strong>, BBC World Service, 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy</span></p> <p>In 1911, someone asked Butler to name the most important invention of the industrial era.</p> <p>Steam, perhaps? Electricity?</p> <p>"No," he said. They would both "be reduced to comparative impotence" without "the greatest single discovery of modern times" - the limited liability corporation.</p> <p><a class="story-body__link" href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04b1g3c"></a>It seems odd to say the corporation was "discovered". But it didn't just appear from nowhere.</p> <h2 class="story-body__crosshead">Creative legal leap</h2> <p>The word "incorporate" means take on bodily form - not a physical body, but a legal one.</p> <p>In the law's eyes, a corporation is something different from the people who own it, or run it, or work for it.</p> <p>And that's a concept lawmakers had to dream up.</p> <p>Without laws saying that a corporation can do certain things - such as own assets, or enter into contracts - the word would be meaningless.</p> <p>The legal ingredients that comprise a corporation came together in a form we would recognise in England, on New Year's Eve, in 1600.</p> <p>Back then, creating a corporation didn't simply involve filing in some routine forms - you needed a royal charter.</p> <p>And you couldn't incorporate with the general aim of doing business and making profits - a corporation's charter specifically said what it was allowed to do, and often also stipulated that nobody else was allowed to do it.</p> <figure class="media-landscape has-caption full-width"><span class="image-and-copyright-container"><img alt="The headquarters of the powerful East India Company, Leadenhall Street, London pictured in 1800" class="responsive-image__img js-image-replace" data-highest-encountered-width="624" datasrc="https://ichef-1.bbci.co.uk/news/320/cpsprodpb/5709/production/_97418222_966675g3bh79.jpg" height="643" src="https://ichef-1.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/5709/production/_97418222_966675g3bh79.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="930"></img><span class="off-screen">Image copyright </span><span class="story-image-copyright">ALAMY</span></span></figure> <p>The legal body created that New Year's Eve was the Honourable East India Company, charged with handling all of England's shipping trade east of the Cape of Good Hope.</p> <h2 class="story-body__crosshead">Liability liberation</h2> <p>Its shareholders were 218 merchants. Crucially - and unusually - the charter granted those merchants limited liability for the company's actions.</p> <p>Why was that so important? Because otherwise, investors were personally liable for everything the business did.</p> <p>If you partnered in a business that ran up debts it couldn't pay, its debtors could come after you - not just for the value of your investment, but for everything you owned.</p> <p>That's worth thinking about: whose business might you be willing to invest in, if you knew that it could lose you your home, and even land you in prison?</p> <p>Perhaps a close family member's? At a push, a trusted friend's?</p> <p>The way we invest today - buying shares in companies whose managers we will never meet - would be unthinkable. And that would severely limit the amount of capital a business venture could raise.</p> <figure class="media-landscape has-caption full-width"><span class="image-and-copyright-container"><img alt="The first fleet of the East India Company leaving Woolwich in 1601, pictured in Cassell's Illustrated Universal History' in 1882" class="responsive-image__img js-image-replace" data-highest-encountered-width="624" datasrc="https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/320/cpsprodpb/B1A9/production/_97418454_976600h33m4b.jpg" height="600" src="https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/B1A9/production/_97418454_976600h33m4b.jpg" width="976"></img><span class="off-screen">Image copyright</span><span class="story-image-copyright">ALAMY</span></span></figure> <p>Back in the 1500s, perhaps that wasn't much of a problem. Most business was local, and personal. But handling England's trade with half the world was a weighty undertaking.</p> <p>Over the next two centuries, the East India Company grew to look less like a trading business than a colonial government.</p> <p>At its peak, it ruled 90 million Indians and employed an army of 200,000 soldiers. It had a meritocratic civil service and issued its own coins.</p> <figure class="media-landscape has-caption full-width"><span class="image-and-copyright-container"><img alt="Half Anna East India Company coins of 1818" class="responsive-image__img js-image-replace" data-highest-encountered-width="624" datasrc="https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/320/cpsprodpb/6389/production/_97418452_976549et175e.jpg" height="549" src="https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/6389/production/_97418452_976549et175e.jpg" width="976"></img><span class="off-screen">Image copyright </span><span class="story-image-copyright">ALAMY</span></span></figure> <p>Meanwhile, the idea of limited liability caught on.</p> <p>In 1811, New York state introduced it, not as a royal privilege, but for any manufacturing company. Other states and countries followed, including the world's leading economy, Britain, in 1854.</p> <h2 class="story-body__crosshead">Industrial growth</h2> <p>Not everyone approved. The Economist magazine was initially sniffy, pointing out that if people wanted limited liability they could agree it through private contracts.</p> <p>But the limited liability company would prove its worth. The new industrial technologies of the 19th Century needed lots of capital.</p> <p>A railway company, for example, needed to raise large sums to lay tracks before it could make a penny in profit. How many investors would risk everything on its success? Not many.</p> <p>Soon, The Economist was gushing that the unknown inventors of limited liability deserved "a place of honour with Watt, Stephenson and other pioneers of the industrial revolution".</p> <p>But the limited liability corporation has its problems, one of which was obvious to the father of modern economic thought, Adam Smith.</p> <figure class="media-portrait has-caption full-width"><span class="image-and-copyright-container"><img alt="Adam Smith" class="responsive-image__img js-image-replace" data-highest-encountered-width="624" datasrc="https://ichef-1.bbci.co.uk/news/320/cpsprodpb/175A0/production/_97584659_8f1159f9-0364-4914-a51b-a05939a54c0a.jpg" height="1100" src="https://ichef-1.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/175A0/production/_97584659_8f1159f9-0364-4914-a51b-a05939a54c0a.jpg" width="976"></img><span class="off-screen">Image copyright </span><span class="story-image-copyright">GETTY IMAGES</span></span></figure> <p>In The Wealth of Nations, in 1776, Smith dismissed the idea that professional managers would do a good job of looking after shareholders' money.</p> <p>"It cannot well be expected that they should watch over it with the same anxious vigilance with which partners in a private co-partnery frequently watch over their own," he wrote.</p> <p>In principle, Smith was right. There's always a temptation for managers to play fast and loose with investors' money.</p> <h2 class="story-body__crosshead">Maximising profit</h2> <p>We've evolved corporate governance laws to try to protect shareholders, but they haven't always succeeded, as investors in <a class="story-body__link" href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-34742691">Enron </a>or <a class="story-body__link" href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-40873568">Lehman Brothers</a> might tell you.</p> <p>And they generate their own tensions.</p> <figure class="media-landscape has-caption full-width"><span class="image-and-copyright-container"><img alt="Enron logo" class="responsive-image__img js-image-replace" data-highest-encountered-width="624" datasrc="https://ichef-1.bbci.co.uk/news/320/cpsprodpb/5A72/production/_86545132_enron2.jpg" height="549" src="https://ichef-1.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/5A72/production/_86545132_enron2.jpg" width="976"></img><span class="off-screen">Image copyright </span><span class="story-image-copyright">AFP</span></span></figure> <p>Consider the fashionable idea of "corporate social responsibility" - where a company might donate to charity, or decide to embrace higher labour or environmental standards than those stipulated in law.</p> <p>It can be clever brand-building, and in some cases may result in higher sales. In others, managers may be using shareholders' money to buy social status or a quiet life.</p> <p>For that reason, the economist Milton Friedman argued that "the social responsibility of business is to maximise its profits". If it's legal, and it makes money, they should do it. And if people don't like it, don't blame the company - change the law.</p> <p>The trouble is that companies can influence the law, too. They can fund lobbyists. They can donate to electoral candidates' campaigns.</p> <h2 class="story-body__crosshead">Short-sighted?</h2> <p>The East India Company quickly learned the value of maintaining cosy relationships with British politicians, who duly bailed it out whenever it got into trouble.</p> <p>In 1770, for example, a famine in Bengal clobbered the company's revenue. British legislators saved it from bankruptcy, by exempting it from tariffs on tea exports to the American colonies, which was, perhaps, short-sighted on their part: it eventually led to the Boston Tea Party, and the American Declaration of Independence.</p> <figure class="media-landscape has-caption full-width"><span class="image-and-copyright-container"><img alt="A copy of the American Declaration of Independence" class="responsive-image__img js-image-replace" data-highest-encountered-width="624" datasrc="https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/320/cpsprodpb/10070/production/_97584656_gettyimages-3259558.jpg" height="549" src="https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/10070/production/_97584656_gettyimages-3259558.jpg" width="976"></img><span class="off-screen">Image copyright </span><span class="story-image-copyright">GETTY IMAGES</span></span></figure> <p>You could say the United States owes its existence to excessive corporate influence on politicians.</p> <p>And arguably, corporate power is even greater today, for a simple reason: in a global economy, corporations can threaten to move offshore.</p> <p>When Britain's lawmakers eventually grew tired of the East India Company's demands, they had the ultimate sanction: in 1874, they revoked its charter.</p> <p>For multinationals with opaque ownership structures, that threat is effectively off the table.</p> <h2 class="story-body__crosshead">Power of hierarchy</h2> <p>We often think of ourselves as living in a world where free market capitalism is the dominant force. Few want a return to the command economies of Mao or Stalin, where hierarchies, not markets, decided what to produce.</p> <p>And yet hierarchies, not markets, are exactly how decisions are taken within companies.</p> <p>When a receptionist or an accounts payable clerk makes a decision, they're not doing so because the price of soy beans has risen. They're following orders from the boss.</p> <p>In the US, bastion of free-market capitalism, about half of all private sector employees work for companies with a payroll of at least 500.</p> <p>Some argue that companies have grown too big, too influential.</p> <p>In 2016, <a class="story-body__link-external" href="http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/02/10/most-americans-say-u-s-economic-system-is-unfair-but-high-income-republicans-disagree/">Pew Research asked Americans if they thought the economic system was "generally fair", or "unfairly favours powerful interests"</a>. By two to one, unfair won. Even The Economist worries that regulators are now too timid about exposing market-dominating companies to a blast of healthy competition.</p> <p>But let's not forget what the limited liability company has done for us.</p> <p>By helping investors pool their capital without taking unacceptable risks, it enabled big industrial projects, stock markets and <a class="story-body__link" href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-40189970">index funds</a>. It played a foundational role in creating the modern economy.</p> <p><strong>Tim Harford writes the Financial Times's Undercover Economist column. <a class="story-body__link" href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04b1g3c">50 Things That Made the Modern Economy</a> is broadcast on the BBC World Service. You can <a class="story-body__link" href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p058qrk3">find more information about the programme's sources</a> and <a class="story-body__link" href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p058qrk3">listen online</a> or <a class="story-body__link" href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04b1g3c/episodes/downloads">subscribe to the programme podcast.</a></strong></p> <p><strong>Article from BBC News: http://www.bbc.com/news/business-40674240</strong></p></div><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=CD4rpqA2gio:FLSFsfcafyY:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=CD4rpqA2gio:FLSFsfcafyY:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=CD4rpqA2gio:FLSFsfcafyY:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=CD4rpqA2gio:FLSFsfcafyY:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=CD4rpqA2gio:FLSFsfcafyY:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=CD4rpqA2gio:FLSFsfcafyY:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice/~4/CD4rpqA2gio" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/2017/09/how-a-creative-legal-leap-helped-create-vast-wealth.html Design Thinking for the Greater Good: Innovation in the Social Sector tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00e54ef4f376883401bb09bdf2b7970d 2017-08-29T10:11:29-04:00 2017-08-29T10:11:29-04:00 Facing especially wicked problems, social sector organizations are searching for powerful new methods to understand and address them. Design Thinking for the Greater Good goes in depth on both the how of using new tools and the why. As a... Drew Boyd <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p class="Default"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: #221f1f;"> <a class="asset-img-link" href="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401b7c91ab529970b-popup" onclick="window.open( this.href, '_blank', 'width=640,height=480,scrollbars=no,resizable=no,toolbar=no,directories=no,location=no,menubar=no,status=no,left=0,top=0' ); return false" style="float: left;"><img alt="Design_thinking_for_the_greater_good_cov" class="asset asset-image at-xid-6a00e54ef4f376883401b7c91ab529970b img-responsive" src="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401b7c91ab529970b-200wi" style="width: 165px; margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px;" title="Design_thinking_for_the_greater_good_cov"></img></a>Facing especially wicked problems, social sector organizations are searching for powerful new methods to understand and address them. <em>Design Thinking for the Greater Good</em> goes in depth on both the <em>how</em> of using new tools and the <em>why</em>. As a way to reframe problems, ideate solutions, and iterate toward better answers, design thinking is already well established in the commercial world. Through ten stories of struggles and successes in fields such as health care, education, agriculture, transportation, social services, and security, the authors show how collaborative creativity can shake up even the most entrenched bureaucracies—and provide a practical roadmap for readers to implement these tools.</span></p> <p class="Default"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: #221f1f;">The design thinkers Jeanne Liedtka, Randy Salzman, and Daisy Azer explore how design thinking helped impoverished farmers adopt new practices in Mexico, kept at-risk California teenagers in school, reduced the frequency of mental health emergencies in Australia, and helped manufacturers and government regulators in Washington find common ground on medical device standards. Across these vastly different problems and sectors, these groups have used the tools of design thinking to reduce risk, manage change, use resources more effectively, bridge the communication gap between parties, and manage the competing demands of diverse stakeholders. Along the way, they have improved the quality of their products and enhanced the experiences of those they serve.</span></p> <p class="Default"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt;">With strategies accessible to analytical and creative types alike, and benefits extending throughout an organization, <em>Design Thinking for the Greater Good</em> will help today's leaders and thinkers implement these practices in their own pursuit of creative solutions that are both innovative and achievable.</span></p> <p class="Default"> </p> <p class="Default"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; background: white;"><strong>Jeanne Liedtka</strong> is a professor at the Darden Graduate School of Business Administration at the University of Virginia. Her books include <em>Solving Problems with Design Thinking</em> (2013), <em>Designing for Growth</em> (2011), and <em>The Designing for Growth Field Book </em>(2013), all from Columbia University Press.</span></p> <p class="Default"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; background: white;"><strong>Randy Salzman</strong> is a journalist and former communications professor. His work has been published in over one hundred magazines, journals, and newspapers, from the<em> Wall Street Journal</em> and the<em> New York Times</em> to <em>Mother Jones</em>, <em>Bicycling,</em> and <em>Style</em>.</span></p> <p class="Default"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; background: white;"><strong>Daisy Azer</strong> is an entrepreneur, principal at Waterbrand Consulting Inc., and adjunct lecturer of design thinking at the Darden Graduate School of Business. Her career spans roles in business development and training and development in the financial industry, education, and technology.</span></p></div><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=ZjGZzUfQNyI:CnZTDsQ8_m0:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=ZjGZzUfQNyI:CnZTDsQ8_m0:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=ZjGZzUfQNyI:CnZTDsQ8_m0:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=ZjGZzUfQNyI:CnZTDsQ8_m0:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=ZjGZzUfQNyI:CnZTDsQ8_m0:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=ZjGZzUfQNyI:CnZTDsQ8_m0:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice/~4/ZjGZzUfQNyI" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/2017/08/design-thinking-for-the-greater-good-innovation-in-the-social-sector.html