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Drew Boyd

  • University of Cincinnati Main Campus
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My Latest Blogs
Innovation in Practice tag:typepad.com,2003:weblog-1425731 2017-11-16T13:03:44-05:00 The Corporate Perspective on Innovation Methods TypePad typepad/dboyd/innovationinpracticehttps://feedburner.google.com Innovation Sighting: Partial Subtraction for Better Beer Drinking tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00e54ef4f376883401bb09d7b4ec970d 2017-11-16T13:03:44-05:00 2017-11-16T13:03:44-05:00 The football season is into full swing. And, no doubt, countless beer drinkers experience the ever so frustrating tension of keeping a clear line of sight for that key play of the game without missing a gulp of their favorite... Drew Boyd <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p><a class="asset-img-link" href="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401b8d2beedba970c-popup" onclick="window.open( this.href, '_blank', 'width=640,height=480,scrollbars=no,resizable=no,toolbar=no,directories=no,location=no,menubar=no,status=no,left=0,top=0' ); return false" style="float: right;"><img alt="Beer" class="asset asset-image at-xid-6a00e54ef4f376883401b8d2beedba970c img-responsive" src="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401b8d2beedba970c-320wi" style="margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;" title="Beer"></img></a>The football season is into full swing. And, no doubt, countless beer drinkers experience the ever so frustrating tension of keeping a clear line of sight for that key play of the game without missing a gulp of their favorite brew. The engineers of the TV Beer Mug saw right through the problem (pun intended) by shaving off one side of the mug. By using the <a href="http://drewboyd.com/category/subtraction/">Subtraction Technique</a>, the makers of the TV Beer Mug have eased the beer drinking, football watching woes of thousands of fans.</p> <p>As <a href="https://gizmodo.com/brilliant-beer-mug-wont-block-the-tv-while-you-chug-1786427465?utm_campaign=socialflow_gizmodo_facebook&amp;utm_source=gizmodo_facebook&amp;utm_medium=socialflow">Gizmodo</a> humorously states,</p> <blockquote> <p>Taking advantage of cutting-edge physics and engineering breakthroughs that are rarely seen outside of aerospace applications, this remarkable $11 mug looks as if one side has been cleaved clean off—which is the secret to how it works. The other side of the mug that usually blocks the view of your TV is gone, leaving you with a clean line of sight every time you take a swig.</p> </blockquote> <p>It’s a perfect example of the Subtraction Technique, one of five in the innovation method, Systematic Inventive Thinking (SIT). It’s also a great example of the Closed World Principle. Here’s how it works:</p> <p>To get the most out of the Subtraction Technique, you follow five steps:</p> <ol> <li>List the product’s or service’s internal components.</li> <li>Select an essential component and imagine removing it. There are two ways: a. Full Subtraction. The entire component is removed. b. Partial Subtraction. Take one of the features or functions of the component away or diminish it in some way.</li> <li>Visualize the resulting concept(no matter how strange it seems).</li> <li>What are the potential benefits, markets, and values? Who would want this new product or service, and why would they find it valuable? If you are trying to solve a specific problem, how can it help address that particular challenge? After you’ve considered the concept“as is” (without that essential component), try replacing the function with something from the Closed World (but not with the original component). You can replace the component with either an internal or external component. What are the potential benefits, markets, and values of the revised concept?</li> <li>If you decide that this new product or service is valuable, then ask: Is it feasible? Can you actually create these new products? Perform these new services? Why or why not? Is there any way to refine or adapt the idea to make it more viable?</li> </ol> <p><a href="http://www.insidetheboxinnovation.com/">Learn</a> how all five techniques can help you innovate – on demand.</p></div><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=Xd3MH_mYJdk:ULCKB2aQJ2A:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=Xd3MH_mYJdk:ULCKB2aQJ2A:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=Xd3MH_mYJdk:ULCKB2aQJ2A:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=Xd3MH_mYJdk:ULCKB2aQJ2A:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=Xd3MH_mYJdk:ULCKB2aQJ2A:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=Xd3MH_mYJdk:ULCKB2aQJ2A:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice/~4/Xd3MH_mYJdk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/2017/11/innovation-sighting-partial-subtraction-for-better-beer-drinking.html Innovation Sighting: Yet Another Multiplication in Cameras tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00e54ef4f376883401b8d2ba044b970c 2017-11-01T10:03:30-04:00 2017-11-01T10:03:30-04:00 Thanks to Light’s newest camera innovation, serious photographers may make it through their upcoming shot lists with a welcomed spring to their step. In attempt to lessen the load of the average DSLR camera, Light created the streamlined L16. Not... Drew Boyd <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p><a class="asset-img-link" href="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401b7c92f96c5970b-popup" onclick="window.open( this.href, '_blank', 'width=640,height=480,scrollbars=no,resizable=no,toolbar=no,directories=no,location=no,menubar=no,status=no,left=0,top=0' ); return false" style="float: right;"><img alt="Camera Lens" class="asset asset-image at-xid-6a00e54ef4f376883401b7c92f96c5970b img-responsive" src="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401b7c92f96c5970b-320wi" style="margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;" title="Camera Lens"></img></a>Thanks to Light’s newest camera innovation, serious photographers may make it through their upcoming shot lists with a welcomed spring to their step. In attempt to lessen the load of the average DSLR camera, Light created the streamlined L16. Not surprisingly, the innovation of this camera reflects one of the five innovation templates in Systematic Inventive Thinking (SIT), the Multiplication Technique.</p> <p>The Multiplication Technique is defined as copying an element already existing in the product or service but changing it in some counterintuitive way. Many innovations in cameras, including the basis of photography itself, are based on copying a component and then altering it. Utilizing this innovative pattern, Light replaced the typical DSLR lens with 16 smaller lenses, resulting in a compact camera which claims to provide the same quality photos as the standard DSLR.</p> <p>As described in <a href="https://techcrunch.com/2017/07/14/light-starts-shipping-the-l16-its-16-camera-pocket-dslr-challenger/">Tech Crunch</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>The Light L16 is so-named because it has 16 camera modules, and it combines images from multiple modules at once to create images with greater depth, clarity, detail, color rendering and general quality than you’d otherwise be able to get out of a device that’s essentially the size of a thick smartphone. The L16’s sample images show depth-of-field and sharpness that would leave many DSLRs in the dust, in fact, which is the whole idea of the multi-module array.</p> </blockquote> <p>The L16 is just one example of the benefit to creating with the use of innovation templates. To use the Multiplication Technique, begin by listing the components of the product, process, or service. You pick one of those components, make a copy of it. You keep the original component as is, but the copied component is changed. That creates the virtual product. Using Function Follows Form, you look for potential benefits, and you modify or adapt the concept to improve it to yield an innovative idea.</p> <p>You can view the below video to see the Multiplication Technique at work in the L16.</p> <p class="asset-video"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" gesture="media" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RpXNyWPfs8E?feature=oembed" width="500"></iframe></p> <p> </p></div><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=U5FZFd-T7rA:G_aSHybNGN8:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=U5FZFd-T7rA:G_aSHybNGN8:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=U5FZFd-T7rA:G_aSHybNGN8:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=U5FZFd-T7rA:G_aSHybNGN8:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=U5FZFd-T7rA:G_aSHybNGN8:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=U5FZFd-T7rA:G_aSHybNGN8:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice/~4/U5FZFd-T7rA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/2017/11/innovation-sighting-yet-another-multiplication-in-cameras.html Innovation Sighting: The Subtraction Technique and the No-Huddle Offense tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00e54ef4f376883401b7c92ce187970b 2017-10-23T11:26:42-04:00 2017-10-24T09:01:17-04:00 Few activities are more iconic to American football than the huddle. Bill Pennington, in his New York Times article, “Ready, Set, Gone! The N.F.L.’s Disappearing Huddle” thoughtfully fills out the history, the heritage, and the slow disappearance of this classic... Drew Boyd <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p><a class="asset-img-link" href="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f376883401bb09d00632970d-popup" onclick="window.open( this.href, '_blank', 'width=640,height=480,scrollbars=no,resizable=no,toolbar=no,directories=no,location=no,menubar=no,status=no,left=0,top=0' ); return false" style="float: right;"></a>Few activities are more iconic to American football than the huddle. Bill Pennington, in his New York Times article, “<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/19/sports/football/nfl-huddle-offense.html?hp&amp;action=click&amp;pgtype=Homepage&amp;clickSource=story-heading&amp;module=second-column-region&amp;region=top-news&amp;WT.nav=top-news">Ready, Set, Gone! The N.F.L.’s Disappearing Huddle</a>” thoughtfully fills out the history, the heritage, and the slow disappearance of this classic practice. And while innovation is often thought of in connection to a tangible product, the emerging use of the “no-huddle offense” in football is an excellent example of innovation through the use of the innovation template known as The Subtraction Technique.</p> <p>The Subtraction Technique is one of the five innovation methods in Systematic Inventive Thinking (SIT). It works by removing an element of the system that seemed essential to identify a new value or benefit. When it comes to the no-huddle offense, teams are removing the essential component, the huddle, and replacing it with hand signals and code words. The benefit? More time on the clock to advance the ball and elevate a team’s chance for a win.</p> <p>As Pennington explains,</p> <blockquote> <p>Huddles remain the pervasive norm, but increasingly, many are condensed to several harried seconds, as quarterbacks bolt to the line of scrimmage and rely on hand signals and code words to communicate a new play to teammates as they line up.</p> <p data-para-count="323" data-total-count="1127">This season, some offenses have spent nearly half a game — 25 plays — without stopping to huddle. Many teams’ defensive units huddle even less often. As a trend, it is viewed as inevitable innovation, and most in the N.F.L. expect the pace to quicken in coming seasons, a transformational jolt to an old-style league.</p> </blockquote> <p>Time will tell whether this innovative strategy will outlive the infamous huddle. But it’s a perfect example of how innovation through templates knows no boundaries.</p> <p>To get the most out of the <a href="http://drewboyd.com/category/subtraction/">Subtraction Technique</a>, you follow five steps:</p> <ol> <li>List the product’s or service’s internal components.</li> <li>Select an essential component and imagine removing it. There are two ways: a. Full Subtraction. The entire component is removed. b. Partial Subtraction. Take one of the features or functions of the component away or diminish it in some way.</li> <li>Visualize the resulting concept(no matter how strange it seems).</li> <li>What are the potential benefits, markets, and values? Who would want this new product or service, and why would they find it valuable? If you are trying to solve a specific problem, how can it help address that particular challenge? After you’ve considered the concept“as is” (without that essential component), try replacing the function with something from the Closed World (but not with the original component). You can replace the component with either an internal or external component. What are the potential benefits, markets, and values of the revised concept?</li> <li>If you decide that this new product or service is valuable, then ask: Is it feasible? Can you actually create these new products? Perform these new services? Why or why not? Is there any way to refine or adapt the idea to make it more viable?</li> </ol> <p><a href="http://www.insidetheboxinnovation.com/">Learn</a> how all five techniques can help you innovate – on demand.</p></div><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=TPdVyThChlQ:Dt1oyFfaT3Q:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=TPdVyThChlQ:Dt1oyFfaT3Q:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=TPdVyThChlQ:Dt1oyFfaT3Q:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=TPdVyThChlQ:Dt1oyFfaT3Q:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=TPdVyThChlQ:Dt1oyFfaT3Q:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=TPdVyThChlQ:Dt1oyFfaT3Q:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice/~4/TPdVyThChlQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/2017/10/innovation-sighting-the-subtraction-technique-and-the-no-huddle-offense.html Look Inside a Woman's Purse tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00e54ef4f376883401b7c927181e970b 2017-10-05T09:10:44-04:00 2017-10-24T09:02:13-04:00 By: Tom Ewing, Senior Director, System1 Group “First I look at the purse” sang Motown’s The Countours. Kelley Styring, principal of InsightFarm, would sympathise. In 2006, then again in 2016, she asked hundreds of women to empty out their purses... Drew Boyd <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p><em>By: Tom Ewing, Senior Director, System1 Group</em></p> <p><br>“First I look at the purse” sang Motown’s The Countours. Kelley Styring, principal of InsightFarm, would sympathise. In 2006, then again in 2016, she asked hundreds of women to empty out their purses in the name of science. Her project, “an archaeology of the American handbag”, explores the meaning both personal and practical of purses – and, er, ‘murses’, since men are carrying them too: one of the big shifts between waves of the study. (The men themselves might prefer the term ‘satchels’.)</p> <p>Between them, the purse-carrying women and men of America are toting an astonishing 271 million bags: “homes away from home” which are a remarkable commercial opportunity for any company making things that might find their way into them. But this opportunity is poorly understood, and manufacturers of both purses and purse contents are failing their customers, according to Styring. The interior of a purse is an extremely hostile environment, halfway between a tumble-dryer and a lucky dip, and the lipsticks, coupons, receipts, and headphone cords which find their way in are prone to gradually degrade into either trash or “digital hairballs”. The purse is both beautifully practical – a little bag you can carry your life’s essentials in – and desperately unwieldy during the precious seconds when you’re trying to get something out of it.</p> <p>Styring’s entertaining presentation married survey research and ethnography to explore not just what’s in America’s purses (1 in 10 contains a weapon, though the main categories are money, cards, phones, personal care, and keys) but what they mean. She explored the <em>Circle of Preparedness</em> – the way the contents of a purse enable its carrier to be ready to help herself, her family, her friends and often complete strangers who need a band-aid, a pen, or a light. The purse is an entry point into adulthood for women in their early teens for whom it becomes a mobile resource for their newfound independence, carrying money, phones and sanitary items. Gain entry to a purse in these formative years and categories and brands can make a customer for life.</p> <p>But the purse is also a kind of limbo, into which items are placed and forgotten: one woman Styring surveyed turned out to be carrying 17 different pens, mostly promotional ones liberated from stores and banks. Unwanted receipts, degraded tissues, and forgotten gewgaws fight for space with genuine essentials. And into this behavioural melting pot, an unexpected interloper has found its way between 2006 and now: the smartphone.</p> <p>Behaviours around smartphones both complement and duplicate behaviours around purses. Both are connectors – bridges between home (where needs are made) and the store (where needs are satisfied). Both are also ways of organising and making portable one’s everyday life – the purse content categories which dropped off between ways are things like coupons, which are increasingly being replaced by e-commerce and m-commerce offers. Despite this, the weight and the number of items in purses remained constant over the last decade – for every obsolete category, some new item comes to take their place.</p> <p>Smartphones and purses may overlap in function, but purses are also where you put your phone. This integration between digital order and physical mess is where Strying sees some of the billions of dollars of innovation potential in the world of the purse. What will smart purses look like – ones that respond to being opened with useful information, or which establish a cone of RFID silence to protect their bearer? There are also plenty of purely physical problems still to solve – there must be a way of designing purse contents for the dangerous environments they are placed in.</p> <p>Styring’s presentation was a delight –rich in insights and stories: her firm InsightFarm has published a book detailing the results of the second wave. You came away feeling that her study was rather like a purse itself: elegantly designed, compact, and full of both useful stuff and unexpected surprises.</p> <p>Article reposted by permission of KNect365. View original article <a href="https://knect365.com/insights/article/d4f73199-9e30-4081-9b5e-9581ca5459fb/look-inside-a-womans-purse?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_campaign=IMI%2FContent%2FM2904%2FSept%20Insights%20Main%202017&amp;utm_source=IMI%20Insights%20%26%20Innovation%20Newsletters&amp;user_id=900047296967&amp;tracker_id=023GZ2TXA">here</a>.</p> <p><em><a href="https://informa.com/divisions/knowledge-and-networking/">KNect365</a>, the Knowledge &amp; Networking Division of Informa, organizes high-quality, content-driven events and programs that enable specialist communities to meet, connect, network and share knowledge. KNect365 provides digital content, memorable face to face experiences, networking and professional development and learning for customers in key industry verticals, including Finance, Life Sciences and Technology.</em></p></div><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=kkx5i75c7nA:A3vmGoejDVc:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=kkx5i75c7nA:A3vmGoejDVc:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=kkx5i75c7nA:A3vmGoejDVc:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=kkx5i75c7nA:A3vmGoejDVc:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=kkx5i75c7nA:A3vmGoejDVc:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=kkx5i75c7nA:A3vmGoejDVc:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice/~4/kkx5i75c7nA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/2017/10/look-inside-a-womans-purse.html