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Drew Boyd

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My Latest Blogs
Innovation in Practice tag:typepad.com,2003:weblog-1425731 2018-07-23T10:06:21-04:00 The Corporate Perspective on Innovation Methods TypePad typepad/dboyd/innovationinpracticehttps://feedburner.google.com Swiping the Blank Slate: Accelerate Your Career Success by Jumpstarting Innovative Thinking tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00e54ef4f3768834022ad3a31284200b 2018-07-23T10:06:21-04:00 2018-07-23T10:06:21-04:00 By Nurit Shmilovitz-Vardi We’ve all been there. Your manager assigns your next project, handing you the relevant materials along with the following demand: “This needs to be big. I want something different, something that stands out, fresh new ideas—something innovative!”... Drew Boyd <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p><strong>By Nurit Shmilovitz-Vardi</strong></p> <p>We’ve all been there. Your manager assigns your next project, handing you the relevant materials along with the following demand:</p> <p>“This needs to be big. I want something different, something that stands out, fresh new ideas—something innovative!”</p> <p>Outwardly you nod, exclaim some words of apparent enthusiasm and motivation, excited to begin this innovating. But inside you’re already banging your head into the wall. Innovate…something new? But how, when it seems like every new idea or direction of thought has already been done—how do you even start?</p> <div data-featherlight-filter="a" data-featherlight-gallery="" data-featherlight-type="image" id="featherlight-gallery"><fieldset class="asset featherlight-gallery noborder" gallery-width="250-2"> <div id="gallery-container"> <ul class="asset-thumbnails"> <li class="asset-thumbnail" draggable="true" id="li0"><a href="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f3768834022ad38349cc200d-pi"><img alt="Capture 1" class="mceNonEditable" src="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f3768834022ad38349cc200d-250si" style="outline: 0px;"></img></a></li> <li class="asset-thumbnail" draggable="true" id="li1"><a href="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f3768834022ad38349ca200d-pi"><img alt="Capture 2" class="mceNonEditable" src="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f3768834022ad38349ca200d-250si" style="outline: 0px;"></img></a></li> </ul> </div> </fieldset></div> <p> Innovative thinking has become a very important skill to have in the modern workplace, especially if you want to stand out and advance your career. According to Robert B. Tucker, a keynote speaker, consultant to over 200 of the Fortune 500, and author of seven bestselling books on innovation, including the latest, <em>Innovation is Everybody’s Business</em>, “Your functional and technical skills are what got you your current job. But… the most valuable skills you can add to your repertoire are not just soft skills but innovation skills.” While soft skills, particularly <em>interpersonal </em>skills increase your value as a team player, innovation skills are what will make you indispensable as an individual.</p> <p>What’s more, acquiring these skills is in the hands of the individual, which Tucker describes as planning a “personal innovation strategy”.</p> <p>Now, let’s return to our current predicament and look at your new project, whatever it may be—marketing campaign, new products, business development modeling. How can you start to develop your own personal innovation strategy and deliver something truly outstanding? Every individual has unique life experiences and perspectives which can lead to original ideas, but oftentimes these ideas are scattered, lacking the guidance to fully form and consolidate into concrete solutions. That’s when you find yourself staring at a screen for hours, just waiting for that “Aha! Moment”.</p> <p>Luckily, there is a way to overcome dreaded blank-state syndrome: structured, systematic thinking methods. These strategies can be learned by anyone, and provide the guiding framework that lifts the cloud of fixed-mindedness and propels you toward the realm of innovation.</p> <p>And now it’s easier than ever to learn and train yourself! Following the ever fast-paced landscape of technology and e-learning, SIT has now launched its very own Online Academy. Through the <a href="https://online.sitsite.com/">SIT Online Academy</a>, you can learn innovative thinking methodology through engaging and efficient videos lead by experienced SIT facilitators, read interesting case studies that further reinforce the content and provide real-world context, and, most importantly, practice the skills through interactive examples and puzzles directly related to your own business challenges.</p> <p>See an example of what we have to offer (and just one of the thinking methods to jumpstart your innovative strategy development) here:</p> <p class="asset-video"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="360" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/246949216" width="640"></iframe></p> <p>Imagine the face of your manager when you present your brilliantly fresh solutions that can bring great value your company. The skills that lead to these ideas are highly revered, especially now in a society that’s rapidly changing and developing at an exponential rate—the current environment starves for innovation capabilities and <em>not only requires</em>, but <em>demands</em> it in order to achieve career success.</p> <p>Steer the wheel on your own path to more career success by taking action now and learning innovation skills with the SIT Online Academy. As an “Inside the Box” blog reader, get limited-time free access now to the first unit of <strong>SIT</strong> <strong>Online Course: Process Innovation is in Order</strong>!</p> <p><a class="asset-img-link" href="https://sitonlineacademypreview.schoolkeep.com/c/5fc2ea39240a8c4973f8e31fe87d0a915206fc3b " onclick="window.open( this.href, '_blank', 'width=640,height=480,scrollbars=no,resizable=no,toolbar=no,directories=no,location=no,menubar=no,status=no,left=0,top=0' ); return false"><img alt="Button" class="asset asset-image at-xid-6a00e54ef4f3768834022ad3834a32200d img-responsive" src="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f3768834022ad3834a32200d-120wi" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="Button"></img></a></p> <p><br> </p> <fieldset class="asset featherlight-gallery noborder" gallery-width="150-2"> <div id="gallery-container"> </div> </fieldset> <p> </p></div><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=3BY7GAnKQBk:PHoQJJwUz28:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=3BY7GAnKQBk:PHoQJJwUz28:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=3BY7GAnKQBk:PHoQJJwUz28:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=3BY7GAnKQBk:PHoQJJwUz28:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=3BY7GAnKQBk:PHoQJJwUz28:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=3BY7GAnKQBk:PHoQJJwUz28:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice/~4/3BY7GAnKQBk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/2018/07/swiping-the-blank-slate-accelerate-your-career-success-by-jumpstarting-innovative-thinking.html Breaking Fixedness: Saving the Boys of the Thai Soccer Team Trapped in a Cave tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00e54ef4f3768834022ad37f8be2200d 2018-07-08T20:37:23-04:00 2018-07-09T09:38:09-04:00 News of a boys soccer team trapped in a cave in Thailand brought back memories of the Chilean miners trapped 2,300 feet underground in August 2010. It took 66 days before the last miner was brought out. The young boys... Drew Boyd <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p><a class="asset-img-link" href="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f3768834022ad37f8bb7200d-popup" onclick="window.open( this.href, '_blank', 'width=640,height=480,scrollbars=no,resizable=no,toolbar=no,directories=no,location=no,menubar=no,status=no,left=0,top=0' ); return false" style="float: right;"><img alt="Ct-thai-soccer-team-cave-rescue-20180704" class="asset asset-image at-xid-6a00e54ef4f3768834022ad37f8bb7200d img-responsive" src="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f3768834022ad37f8bb7200d-320wi" style="margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;" title="Ct-thai-soccer-team-cave-rescue-20180704"></img></a>News of a boys soccer team trapped in a cave in Thailand brought back memories of the Chilean miners trapped 2,300 feet underground in August 2010. It took 66 days before the last miner was brought out. The young boys have much less time given the threat of monsoon rains.</p> <p>The solution in Chile was to "break fixedness" to see new rescue possibilities. That may be what's needed here. Billionaire Elon Musk and his teams are looking at ways to break fixedness by <a href="https://www.teslarati.com/elon-musk-thailand-cave-rescue-wing-inflatables/" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">constructing an inflatable tube</a> to carry them out or perhaps a<a href="https://www.cnn.com/2018/07/08/us/elon-musk-thai-cave-rescue/index.html" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank"> tiny capsule</a> that can fit through the narrow caves. </p> <p>It's a brilliant idea because it goes against the traditional view of how they should be rescued. Consider what happened in Chile (from I<a href="https://www.insidetheboxinnovation.com/" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank"><em>nside the Box: A Proven System of Creativity for Breakthrough Results):</em></a></p> <blockquote> <p>All traditional methods of rescue failed. With hope that anyone would survive the ordeal diminishing hourly, the international rescue team swiftly implemented “Plan B.” An ingenious escape tube that carried the men out of danger one at a time saved all the miners from what otherwise would have been a slow and painful death. After 66 days, the last miner emerged from the dark hole to cheers and celebrations heard around the globe. </p> <p>What most people don’t know is that the solution was more than half a century old. First conceived of in the mid-1950s, the Subtraction-inspired solution has radically changed rescue strategies throughout a broad range of industries and scenarios. </p> <p>In May, 1955, a mineshaft collapsed in the Dahlbusch area in the German city of Gelsenkirchen. Three miners were trapped underground. Although rescuers managed to convey food and water through a small bore hole, they couldn’t get the men out. The collapse had effectively sealed all existing mine shafts. The shafts had been “subtracted.” </p> <p>A 34-year-old engineer working at the site, Eberhard Au, took a different approach to solving the problem. As other rescuers focused on attempting to reopen a mine shaft, Au quietly designed a small cigar-shaped capsule out of ordinary sheet metal. Only 15.2 inches wide, the capsule was small enough to fit into the bore hole the rescuers were using to send food and water down to the minors. Despite its tiny size, the capsule was large enough for a single miner to squeeze into. Rescuers successfully retrieved each of the three German mine workers this way. </p> <p>“What they did at Dahlbusch was a master stroke of genius,” says Jeff Sabo, a 40-year veteran of mine rescue operations who teaches mine rescue at the Mine Safety Training Center in Cadiz, Ohio. “Mine rescue has been around for hundreds of years. But the idea of using a small bore hole to rescue one miner at a time was very innovative.” </p> <p>This solution was obvious in hindsight. But rescuers were blinded by functional and structural fixedness. Humans have been mining the earth for metals and precious stones for more than 40,000 years. Over time, the process has evolved considerable as successive generations come up with new and safer engineering and construction methodologies. The downside of this long history of innovation is that mining professionals believe they truly understand “best practices” for operational efficiency and safety. The sheer weight of experience—usually considered an advantage in a profession—had limited their ability to think creatively.</p> <p>A mine is an intricate interconnected network of vertical, slopped, and horizontal shafts. Miners are proud of the careful planning, rigorous engineering, and strong construction skills required to build a shaft. Each miner possesses an indelible mental map of the entire mine network in his mind. He wouldn’t’ be able to do his job without this mental map. Yet this mental map creates a significant amount of structural fixedness. Whenever a disaster occurs, the first step in mine rescue protocol dictates using the existing infrastructure of mine shafts to release all miners at once. So Plan A involves attempting to unblock the shaft that leads to the victims’ location. This makes perfect sense: Mine engineers, managers, and safety professionals know the exact location of each mine shaft, the structural integrity of each shaft, and how each one connects to all the others. They spent years building these shafts, and many more years working in them. Using existing shafts as rescue conduits is the quickest and safest way to get their colleagues back to the surface of the earth. But sometimes Plan A fails. </p> <p>In Germany, in 1955, Plan A proved untenable. So the rescue team had to “put every option on the table,” according to Rob McGee from the United States Mine Rescue Association. This pushed Au into thinking the unthinkable. Breaking the temptation to view the world through the lens of structural fixedness, he stopped to consider potential replacements within the Closed World. By subtracting and then replacing the main mine shaft with an air hole, he saved not just those three German lives, but many future lives, as his technique was adopted as the gold standard for Plan B by the mining industry. Indeed Au’s capsule rescued trapped individual miners in back-to-back disasters in 1956 and 1957. In 1963, the capsule saved 11 miners trapped at a depth of 190 feet for two weeks in an iron ore mine. Today, the United States Mine Safety and Health Association keeps a capsule like Au’s original one primed and ready to go anywhere in the world it’s needed. </p> <p>The "Phoenix" capsule used to rescue of 33 miners in Chile was an enhanced version of Au’s original design. Engineers from the Chilean navy built three that were slightly larger than Au’s original--eight feet long and 21 inches in diameter—and also equipped with microphones, speakers, and oxygen supplies. Otherwise, Au’s basic idea has proven amazingly robust. </p> <p>Eberhard Au died in 1996 at the age of 75. He never applied for a patent for his capsule. "The main thing is, the lads get out of there,” he reportedly said.</p> <p> </p> </blockquote> <p>I can hear Elon Musk saying the same thing about these boys. Thank you, Elon!</p> <p> </p> <p> </p></div><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=oTUsfbQN0Vc:fz8w7d7r70E:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=oTUsfbQN0Vc:fz8w7d7r70E:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=oTUsfbQN0Vc:fz8w7d7r70E:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=oTUsfbQN0Vc:fz8w7d7r70E:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=oTUsfbQN0Vc:fz8w7d7r70E:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=oTUsfbQN0Vc:fz8w7d7r70E:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice/~4/oTUsfbQN0Vc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/2018/07/breaking-fixedness-saving-the-boys-of-the-thai-soccer-team-trapped-in-a-cave.html Making Big, Bold Assertions to Drive Design Strategy tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00e54ef4f3768834022ad37be690200d 2018-06-25T09:26:28-04:00 2018-06-25T09:26:28-04:00 By Jon Kolko Design strategy is built on assertion. On the way to a great design strategy is the creation of a series of value assertions: driving statements that guide creative exploration and describe our commitment to our customers. Value... Drew Boyd <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p><strong>By Jon Kolko</strong></p> <p><a href="http://drewboyd.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Kolko_headshot.jpg"><img alt="" class="size-thumbnail wp-image-2280 alignright" height="150" sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" src="http://drewboyd.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Kolko_headshot-150x150.jpg" srcset="http://drewboyd.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Kolko_headshot-150x150.jpg 150w, http://drewboyd.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Kolko_headshot-80x80.jpg 80w, http://drewboyd.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Kolko_headshot-85x85.jpg 85w" style="float: right;" width="150"></img></a>Design strategy is built on assertion. On the way to a great design strategy is the creation of a series of value assertions: driving statements that guide creative exploration and describe our commitment to our customers.</p> <p>Value assertions create a set of strategic boundaries, framed as promises, and then describe how our company is set up to deliver on those promises. The assertions are developed by:</p> <ol> <li>Describing customer expectations – the things customers presume a company will do, make, deliver, or present to them.</li> <li>Making an assertion of value – the benefits a company promises to deliver to meet or exceed expectations</li> <li>Presenting fulfillments – the ways a company will deliver on those expectations</li> </ol> <p>A big, bold value assertion for an educational company might be, “We promise to help minimize anxiety in college students as they make academic decisions.” A value assertion for a digital collaboration company might be, “We promise to help our customers feel a sense of physical community while working remotely from one-another.” And a value assertion for a healthcare software company might be, “We promise to help doctors feel efficient while making data-driven decisions.”</p> <p>These assertions are promises, and they focus on feelings paired with utility. This is part of a design strategy, and one way it differs from a business strategy is that it emphasizes the styles of emotional experiences we want our customers to have.</p> <p>I run a design strategy company called Modernist Studio. At Modernist, we recently worked with an organization – call it First Financial – that offers complex financial products. As we collaboratively developed our design strategy, our business partners continued to focus on the things they could do as a company: they could develop new products, better train their sales representatives, and create online tools to help educate the market. But all of these make assumptions about what people want and need. Do they need new products? Are they interested in interacting with sales reps? Are online tools useful?</p> <p>We re-framed the way they thought about their customer/product interactions by grounding thinking in user research, a common approach for justifying design recommendations. Our research with customers showed that they were interested in learning about the financial products, but only on their own terms and schedule, and in a unique way: they wanted to develop a big picture understanding of the financial landscape and the language used to describe the various financial products, and then they would go dormant for a few weeks. Then, they would revisit the information and get a little more detailed, learning new terminology. Then, after a few more weeks, they would make a purchasing decision. At each stage in the process, they were looking for a different type of information, and they wanted that information delivered comparable to their pace of exploration. This incremental process was a way for them to feel less overwhelmed. It was a bite-sized way to learn.</p> <p><strong>Customer Expectations</strong><br>First, we described customer expectations: “<em>First Financial progressively teaches me about their products and services on my terms and in language I understand.</em>” This statement describes what a person expects a company to do. It’s concise and direct – it’s focused, in this case, on education (not on purchasing, customer service, onboarding, or any other key business activity; just on education). And it’s written from the perspective of the customer, not from the company. By articulating a single sentence of expectation, we’ve ranked and judged customer needs and identified <em>the most important thing.</em></p> <p>This framing of customer expectations is built on a synthesis of our research. Customers say a lot of things during research, and in this case, not all of them focused on education. But the team identified a continuity in this theme, and decided that the continuity was critical in helping customers buy what’s right for them.  This was not an overnight prioritization. It came through hours of exploration, debate, and discussion.</p> <p><strong>Assertion of Value</strong><br>Next, we simply recast that expectation as an assertion, or a promise: “We promise to progressively teach our customers about our products and services on their terms and in language they understand.” It’s the exact same idea, but written as a commitment. The word “promise” is selected on purpose. This is a big, bold assertion – a promise is a guarantee. If we don’t do this, we’ve failed. And such a bold promise forces us to become pragmatic, quickly, because we now know what we’re signing up for. It needs to be attainable.</p> <p>This is what’s meant when we talk about a value proposition, but it’s a proposition around how we help customers, not necessarily around the actual products they sell. This statement isn’t about the financial security they’ll get from a financial instrument that First Financial sells – it’s about the promise of their experience navigating through the financial journey.</p> <p><strong>Fulfillments</strong><br>Finally, we can create fulfillments, which are ways we’ll deliver on our promise. To make our assertion become real, we’ll need to act in certain ways, do things, and build things. For example, we can fulfill our promise through curation; “We will deliver on our promise by presenting only some of our products, rather all of them.” Or, we can fulfill our promise by using common language, rather than factually correct language; “We will deliver on our promise by sacrificing accuracy in terminology for accessible, colloquial language.”</p> <p>If we put it all together, the path from expectation, to value, to fulfillment looks like this:</p> <p>We promise to progressively teach our customers about our products and services on their terms and in language they understand. We will deliver on our promise by…</p> <ul> <li><em>Presenting only some of our products, rather all of them</em></li> <li><em>Sacrificing accuracy in terminology for accessible, colloquial language</em></li> <li><em>Displaying product facets next to one-another, so they can be compared</em></li> <li><em>Minimizing the presence and pressure of “buy” calls to action</em></li> </ul> <p>These are product fulfillments. They can also be service, brand, or organizational fulfillments:</p> <ul> <li><em>Speaking consistently across channels with one uniform set of words about our products</em></li> <li><em>Acting empathetically and with a supportive voice in our call centers</em></li> </ul> <p>The process of moving from expectation to assertion to fulfillment doesn’t tell us what to build – that comes from creative vision. But the process points at characteristics of <em>how to build it</em>. They add assessment criteria for judging if a design or business decision is a good idea. The assertions and fulfillments are artificial, but once they are articulated, they become firm. We all agree to them, and now we have a common language for understanding what is good and what is bad. And, we have a common framework for gauging if and how we are achieving out value promise – the promise we’ve asserted and committed to.</p> <div> <div> <div> <div> <div> <div> <div> <div> <div> <div> <div>About the author:</div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div><a href="http://drewboyd.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Kolko_cover.jpg"><img alt="" class="wp-image-2286 alignleft" height="95" sizes="(max-width: 67px) 100vw, 67px" src="http://drewboyd.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Kolko_cover-200x300.jpg" srcset="http://drewboyd.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Kolko_cover-200x300.jpg 200w, http://drewboyd.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Kolko_cover-97x146.jpg 97w, http://drewboyd.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Kolko_cover-33x50.jpg 33w, http://drewboyd.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Kolko_cover-50x75.jpg 50w, http://drewboyd.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Kolko_cover.jpg 333w" style="float: right;" width="63"></img></a><a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://www.jonkolko.com/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1530016934809000&amp;usg=AFQjCNEd-dinAVGKTVmaaKQ8bie-zZVadg" href="http://www.jonkolko.com/" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">Jon Kolko</a> is the author of <em>Creative Clarity</em>, Partner at Modernist Studio, and the Founder of Austin Center for Design. Previously the Vice President of Design at Blackboard, he has worked extensively with both startups and Fortune 500 companies. He has been a Professor of Interaction and Industrial Design at the Savannah College of Art and Design, and has taught at the University of Texas at Austin, the Center for Design Studies of Monterrey, Mexico, and Malmö University, Sweden.</div></div><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=2S883Dtx5RQ:okIbOgNWBwY:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=2S883Dtx5RQ:okIbOgNWBwY:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=2S883Dtx5RQ:okIbOgNWBwY:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=2S883Dtx5RQ:okIbOgNWBwY:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=2S883Dtx5RQ:okIbOgNWBwY:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=2S883Dtx5RQ:okIbOgNWBwY:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice/~4/2S883Dtx5RQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/2018/06/making-big-bold-assertions-to-drive-design-strategy.html Innovation Sighting: Attribute Dependency and the Shape-Shifting Mannequin tag:typepad.com,2003:post-6a00e54ef4f3768834022ad3524992200c 2018-06-11T15:57:47-04:00 2018-06-11T15:57:47-04:00 Robotics and Fashion Design are two industries not typically paired together. Designer Audrey-Laure Bergenthal has done just that by designing a robotic mannequin that can change size in a matter of seconds. After hearing from women who could never find... Drew Boyd <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p><a class="asset-img-link" href="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f3768834022ad37838e2200d-popup" onclick="window.open( this.href, '_blank', 'width=640,height=480,scrollbars=no,resizable=no,toolbar=no,directories=no,location=no,menubar=no,status=no,left=0,top=0' ); return false" style="float: right;"><img alt="Mannequin 2" class="asset asset-image at-xid-6a00e54ef4f3768834022ad37838e2200d img-responsive" src="http://www.innovationinpractice.com/.a/6a00e54ef4f3768834022ad37838e2200d-320wi" style="margin: 0px 0px 5px 5px;" title="Mannequin 2"></img></a>Robotics and Fashion Design are two industries not typically paired together. Designer Audrey-Laure Bergenthal has done just that by designing a robotic mannequin that can change size in a matter of seconds. After hearing from women who could never find clothing to fit their body type, Bergenthal set out to find a solution to this problem by innovating a new structure on which clothes are designed. The result is <a href="https://www.euveka.com/en">Euveka’s</a> life-size robotic wonder.</p> <p>Euveka’s shape-shifting mannequin is a great example of innovation that utilizes the template known as Attribute Dependency. Attribute Dependency is one of the five innovation methods of <a href="http://www.sitsite.com/"><strong>Systematic Inventive Thinking</strong></a> (SIT). It works by creating (or breaking) a dependency between two attributes of a product or its environment. In the case of Euveka’s mannequin, designers simply enter the needed body measurements in the accompanying app, and the mannequin changes shape within seconds.</p> <p>As <a href="http://www.alphr.com/business/1008154/euveka-robot-mannequin-changes-shape-size">Alphr.com</a> states,</p> <blockquote> <p>The level of customization on the mannequins is truly impressive, letting designers independently tweak the height, thigh size, hip diameter, waist, chest, bust and shoulders. That means you can be designing clothes for a five-foot child one moment, and a 6’3” obese woman the next (a male version of the mannequin is in the works, apparently). It’s like a video game avatar creator come to life.</p> </blockquote> <p>It’s true that anyone can learn to create by utilizing the SIT methods. If you would like to get the most out of the Attribute Dependency Technique, follow these steps:</p> <ol> <li>List internal/external variables.</li> <li>Pair variables (using a 2 x 2 matrix)</li> </ol> <ul> <li>Internal/internal</li> <li>Internal/external</li> </ul> <ol start="3"> <li>Create (or break) a dependency between the variables.</li> <li>Visualize the resulting virtual product.</li> <li>Identify potential user needs.</li> <li>Modify the product to improve it.</li> </ol> <p>For a demonstration of Euveka’s mannequin, see the video below:</p> <p class="asset-video"><iframe allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Nfxq-mpv6gg" width="560"></iframe></p> <p> </p></div><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=O7-zpT-1SZ4:ztNy6i7-PUM:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=O7-zpT-1SZ4:ztNy6i7-PUM:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=O7-zpT-1SZ4:ztNy6i7-PUM:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=O7-zpT-1SZ4:ztNy6i7-PUM:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?i=O7-zpT-1SZ4:ztNy6i7-PUM:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?a=O7-zpT-1SZ4:ztNy6i7-PUM:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/dboyd/innovationinpractice/~4/O7-zpT-1SZ4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> http://www.innovationinpractice.com/innovation_in_practice/2018/06/innovation-sighting-attribute-dependency-and-the-shape-shifting-mannequin.html